Street Food Da Nang

 

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Street Food Da Nang

History of Street Food

Street food vending is found all around the world, but varies greatly between regions and cultures. For example, Dorling Kindersley describes the street food of Vietnam as being “fresh and lighter than many of the cuisines in the area” and “drawing heavily on herbs, chile peppers and lime”, while street food of Thailand is “fiery” and “pungent with shrimp paste … and fish sauce.” New York City’s signature street food is the hot dog, however, New York street food also includes everything from “spicy Middle Eastern falafel or Jamaican jerk chicken to Belgian waffles” In Hawaii, the local street food tradition of “plate lunch” (rice, macaroni salad, and a portion of meat) was inspired by the bento of the Japanese who had been brought to Hawaii as plantation workers.[30] In Denmark, sausage wagons allow passersby to purchase sausages and hot dogs.
During the American Colonial period, “street vendors sold oysters, roasted corn ears, fruit, and sweets at low prices to all classes.” Oysters, in particular, were a cheap and popular street food until around 1910 when overfishing and pollution caused prices to rise. Street vendors in New York City faced a lot of opposition. After previous restrictions had limited their operating hours, street food vendors were completely banned in New York City by 1707.[18] Many women of African descent made their living selling street foods in America in the 18th and 19th centuries, with products ranging from fruit, cakes, and nuts in Savannah, to coffee, biscuits, pralines, and other sweets in New Orleans. Cracker Jack started as one of many street food exhibits at the Columbian Exposition.

In the 19th century, street food vendors in Transylvania sold gingerbread-nuts, cream mixed with corn, as well as bacon and other meat fried on top of ceramic vessels with hot coals inside. French fries, consisting of fried strips of potato, probably originated as a street food in Paris in the 1840s. Street foods in Victorian London included tripe, pea soup, pea pods in butter, whelk, prawns, and jellied eels.

Ramen, originally brought to Japan by Chinese immigrants about 100 years ago, began as a street food for laborers and students. However, it soon became a “national dish” and even acquired regional variations.[24] The street food culture of Southeast Asia today was heavily influenced by coolie workers imported from China during the late 19th century.
A whole street was taken up by street food vendors during the Yasothon Rocket Festival in Thailand.
In Thailand, although street food did not become popular among native Thai people until the early 1960s, because of rapid urban population growth, by the 1970s it had “displaced home-cooking.”

Da Nang

Da Nang is the commercial and educational center of Central Vietnam; its well-sheltered, easily accessible port and its location on the path of National Route 1A and the North-South Railway make it a hub for transportation. It is located within 100 km of several UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including the Imperial City of Huế, the Old Town of Hội An, and the Mỹ Sơn ruins. The city was previously known as Cửa Hàn during early Đại Việt settlement, and as Tourane (or Turon) during the period of French colonization.

Before 1997, the city was part of Quảng Nam-Đà Nẵng province. On January 1, 1997, Đà Nẵng was separated from Quảng Nam province to become one of five independent (centrally-controlled) municipalities in Vietnam. Đà Nẵng is listed as a first class city, and has a higher urbanization ratio than any of Vietnam’s other provinces or centrally governed cities. As of the 2009 census, Da Nang was the fifth most populated city in Vietnam.

Da Nang is also a place for authentic local cuisines. Due to its low volume of visitors, residents’ lives take place the way they have been for years. Many street vendors can be found in the market and along Han River, offering My Quang (Quang noodle). If you need romance to set the feeling, book a dinner cruise that go along Han River. The myriad restaurants option along My Khe Beach, a few outstanding names such as My Hanh, For You and the likes, offer fresh sea food at unbeatable prices.

Da Nang is probably most known among Vietnamese for its speedy real estate and private property development. The beach slide, which starts with Lifestyle Resort and ends in the border with Hoi An, is fully privatized, with major land used for constructing beach resorts and ocean villas. What this mean for tourists is a second-to-none beach holiday in Vietnam – in other words, Da Nang has recently emerged as a luxury and MICE destination that can beat the all-too-famous Nha Trang.